Western Australia climate guide

Below are average maximum temperatures at popular destinations in Western Australia for next month - January. Select a destination to see the climate guide for all months of the year.

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The climate guide for Western Australia shows long term monthly weather averages processed from data supplied by CRU (University of East Anglia), the Met Office & the Netherlands Meteorological Institute. Find out more about our data sources.

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Metric (°C / mm)  |  Imperial (°F / inches)

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Western Australia climate overview

This immense state covers a third of the Australian continent and a diversity of different landscapes, where remote indigenous communities contrast with the cosmopolitan city of Perth with its impressive skyline and relaxed atmosphere.

A huge expanse of sandy plains and scrub dominate the interior of Western Australia, with the Great Sandy Desert to the north and the Great Victoria Desert to the south. Summer temperatures are hot, becoming extreme in the north where occasional summer rains temporarily fill shallow salt lakes. Daytime winter temperatures are comfortable but can become cold at night under clear skies.

Bordering the Great Sandy Desert to the north are the impressive Kimberly Ranges. This is home to the Wolf Creek meteorite crater and the Bungle Bungles, an ancient sandstone massif. Tropical summer downpours over the northern mountains feed seasonal raging rivers from December to March, which cut deep gorges through striking red plains leading down to a heavily indented coast. Summers are also prone to occasional cyclones along the whole Northwest coast. Winters are dry and temperatures remain warm or hot all year.

There are also low, undulating mountains bordering the desert in the west. Hot summer temperatures spark off occasional summer showers, which temporarily fill dried riverbeds and support some highland greenery. The mountains run down to a wide coastal plain, which is fertile enough in the south to support vast wheat-lands, vineyards and impressive eucalypt forests.

The long Indian Ocean coastline is also where most of the population lives, particularly in the south around state capital Perth, where there are stunning sandy beaches. Summers here are dry, hot, and sunny with a welcome sea breeze on most afternoons. Winters are cool and wet at times.

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